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Showing posts from August, 2011

CONFRERE

CONFRERE<con-frair>

A confrere is a fellow worker.
n. [F.] Fellow member of a fraternity; intimate associate.


You are a good confrere.  I like working with you.


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GRASPABLE

GRASPABLE
<grair-spa-bul>

Graspable means to understand or comprehend.

Your words are graspable.  I understand what you are saying.


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EBULLIENCE

EBULLIENCE
ee-bul-yints
It means:  Overflowing with happiness.  High spirits.
Daily use:  I felt great ebullience when they yelled surprise!  All my friends were there.
Memory trick:  eBullience eBull (reminds of)  =  A bull horn ience(reminds of)  =  science  bull horn + science A bull horn's science is to shout out loud Shout out loud about your great happiness.
Listen: Ebullience

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APROPOS

APROPOS <ap-pro-po>
To do something at the right time.
Appropriate.
The email was very apropos.
It was just in time for my meeting.

1. Opportunely or opportune; seasonably or seasonable. “A tale extremely apropos.
Pope.2. By the way; to the purpose; relevant; suitably to the place or subject; — a word used to introduce an incidental observation, suited to the occasion, though not strictly belonging to the narration.

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RECONDITE

RECONDITE <ree-kon-dyt>
Not easily understood.
Hidden or concealed.

Please do not paint a recondite picture. I like simple art.

1. Hidden from the mental or intellectual view; secret; abstruse; as recondite causes of things. 2. Dealing in things abstruse; profound; searching; as recondite studies. ´Recondite learning'

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ENNUI

ENNUI
<on-wee>

Tiredness caused by a lack of interest.
Boredom.

I feel an ennui. Can we end this meeting?

A feeling of weariness and disgust; dullness and languor of spirits, arising from satiety or want of interest; tedium.

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LOQUACIOUS

LOQUACIOUS
low-qway-shish
.
Talking too much or too freely.

Thanks for sending your loquacious email. It took hours to read.

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GARRULOUS

GARRULOUS <gar-ru-lus>
To ramble and talk about boring things.
It also means to be loud and flashy.

Don’t be garrulous.  Let's change the topic to something more interesting.


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ostentatious

ostentatious
ah-sten-nay-shish

Ostentatious means flashy or gaudy.

Your flowered hat is ostentatious.

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punctilious

punctilious
<punk-tilly-us>

To be precise or to do something with great care.

Your email was punctilious.  It was very good.


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Mete

Mete
<meet>

To give or divide.
I mete half of my money to you.

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Certitude

Certitude

Pronounced:
<Cert . titude>

My use:
I think with certitude that the team will finish the project. It is an easy project to do.

Means:
To be certain. To be completely sure about something.

Literary:
So various, so beautiful, so new, Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light, Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain; – Matthew Arnold, poet,

Memory trick:
Cert . itude
Cert (Reminds of) Certain or sure
itude (reminds of) attitude or a way of thinking
sure thinking


Listen: Certitude

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Ardent

Ardent

Pronounced:
<Are – dent>

My use:
I see you are ardent about my new idea. Thank you for your support. 

Means:
Very enthusiastic

Literary:
The ardent went, cheering all day, they soon were spent. 

Memory trick:
Ar . Dent
Ar (reminds of) Are
Dent (reminds of) Indent or to bang on something
They are so enthusiastic, they are banging on things.

Listen: Ardent


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Mollify– New Word A Day

Mollify– New Word A Day
Mollify
Pronounced:

My use:
I see they are angry. I will mollify them with my words and they will be happy.

Means:
To make someone who is angry become happy by saying good words.

Literary:
if you are not happy; then I, will use my words to mollify, your anger will say goodbye

Memory trick:
Moll . if . y
Moll (reminds of) mal or bad
If ( reminds of) if or unsure
y (sounds like) I or me
I make you feel unsure about feeling bad

Listen: Mollify

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Pejorative

Pejorative
Pronounced:
Pee-jah-rit-teev

My use:
I never use pejorative words. I only say good things about other people.

Means:
An insulting word; to say bad words about someone; or yourself

Literary:
I never use a pejorative, I always use a positive, it is a better way to live

Memory trick:
Pe . J. Orative
Pe (reminds of) Pea or a something small
Orative (reminds of) Orate or to say something
Say something small about someone

Listen: Pejorative

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Neoteric

Neoteric

Pronounced:
<nee-o-ter-rik>

My use:
Airplanes are neoteric. They did not exist a thousand years ago.

Means:
Recent in origin; modern; new.

Literary:
Some being ancient, others neoterical. –Bacon. 

Memory trick:
Neo . teric
Neo (means) new
Teric (reminds of) terrific
New and terrific 

Listen: Neoteric


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Repast

Repast
Pronounced:
<re-past>

My use:
It is time for some repast. A nice long weekend will be a perfect repast.

Means:
Refreshment. The act of taking food or anything that refreshes.

Literary:
By Denham
“That which is taken as food; a meal; figuratively, any refreshment. “Sleep . . . thy best repast.”

Memory trick:
re . past
re (reminds of) = refresh
past (reminds of) past
refresh from the past


Listen: Repast

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Nugatory

Nugatory

Pronounced:
<new-ga-tor-ree>

My use:
I think that pennies are nugatory.  You cannot buy any thing for a penny.

Means:
Insignificant. Ineffectual. Trifling.

Literary:
By Mill
It is obviously nugatory to say, that this new supply may not find purchasers, or the new demand may not find the commodities to which it is directed.

Memory trick:
Nug . a . tory
nug (reminds of) = nugget or small piece
a (reminds of) a
tory (reminds of) story
nugget of a story


Listen: Nugatory

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Sycophant

Sycophant

Pronounced:
<sic-a-fant>

My use:
I never act like a sycophant.  I always tell the truth when I give a compliment.

Means:
A person who gives false compliments to in order to get something.  False flatterer.

Literary:
By Dreiser
He was not a sycophant in any sense of the word, but a shrewd, cold business man, far shrewder than his brother gave him credit for.

Memory trick:
syco . phant
syco (reminds of) = sicko or unhealthy
phant (reminds of) pant or heavy breathing
sicko pant


Listen: Sycophant

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Neologism

Neologism

Pronounced:
<nee-ah-la-jiz-am>

My use:
Twitter is a neologism. It became a new word because it was a new idea.

Means:
A new word, phrase, or expression.

Literary use:
By Mrs. Browning
The introduction of new words, or the use of old words in a new sense.

Memory trick:
neo . log . ism
neo (means) = new
log  (reminds of) log or book
ism  (means) the theory of
new log the theory of


Listen: Neologism

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Benignant

Benignant

Pronounced:
<ba-nig-nant>

My use:
You are a benignant person. You are the kindest manager to all your team members.

Means:
Kind and gracious to those who you lead.

Literary use:
By Longfellow
Doubtless criticism was originally benignant, pointing out the beauties of a work rather that its defects.

Memory trick:
beni . gnant
beni (reminds of) = beneficial
gnant  (reminds of) giant
beneficial giant


Listen: Benignant

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Supposition

Supposition

Pronounced:
<sup-o-sish-shun>

My use:
I really like your supposition. But I think you’re wrong about the moon being made out of cheese.


Means:
Imagining as true what is not true. Belief without good evidence.  Poor.

Literary use:
By Tillotson
This is only an infallibility upon supposition that if a thing be true, it is imposible to be false.

Memory trick:
suppos . it . ion
suppos (reminds of) = suppose
it (reminds of) it
ion (sounds like) un or not
suppose it un


Listen: Supposition

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Indigent

Indigent
Pronounced:
<in-dee-gent>

My use:
I never worry about becoming indigent.
I am too busy to count money because I have too many blessings to count.

Means
Destitute of property or means of comfortable subsistence.  Poor.

Literary use:
By Ralph Waldo Emerson
Wealth and poverty are seen for what they are. It begins to be seen that the poor are only they who feel poor, and poverty consists in feeling poor. The rich, as we reckon them, and among them the very rich, in a true scale would be found very indigent and ragged.


Memory trick:
Indi . gent
indi (reminds of) = independent or apart
gent (reminds of) gentleman or man
independent gent


Listen: Indigent

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Jocularity

Jocularity
Pronounced:
<jock-u-la-rit-tee>

Fun with humor.  Merriment.

My use:

The jocularity in this room is amazing.  It’s nice to see people having fun.

Literary use:
By Fitzgerald
He must have lightened the way with true clerical jocularity. Looking back, as he wrote, the little ordinary incidents of an ordinary journey were quickened into events of a most exquisite humor.

Memory trick:
joc . u . larity
joc (reminds of) = joke
u (reminds of) you
larity (reminds of) clarity or easy to understand
joke you with clarity


Listen: Jocularity

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Mien

Mien
Pronounced:
<meen>

Manner. Demeanor.

My use:

You have a very pleasant mien.  Your parents must have taught you good manners.

Literary use:
By Alexander Pope
Vice is a monster of so frightful mien,  As, to be hated, needs but to be seen.

Memory trick:
mien
mien (sounds like) = mean or average or usual
the average way you are


Listen: Mien


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Propitious

Propitious

Pronounced:
<pro-pish-us>

Convenient. Favorable. Kind

My use:
The weather today is propitious.  A sunny day is always good for a picnic.

Literary use:
By Bront
The dew fell, but with propitious softness; no breeze whispered.

Memory trick:
prop . it. ious
prop(reminds of) = proper or correct
it(reminds of) = it
ious (sounds like) = us
proper it is to us

Listen: Propitious

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Winsome

Winsome


Pronounced:
<win-sum>
Causing joy or pleasure.

My use:
There is a winsome tone to your voice. Do you have good news?

Literary use:
By Emerson
Still plotting how their hungry ear. That winsome voice again might hear.

Memory trick:
win . some
win(reminds of) = to win or to gain with reward
some(reminds of) = some or a bunch
win a bunch

Listen: Winsome


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Misnomer

Misnomer  Pronounced:
<mis-nohm-er>

An error in naming something.  A wrong name for a person.

My use:
It is a misnomer to call it work when you like what you do.  It should be called play.

Literary use:
By Whately
The word “synonym” is fact a misnomer.

Memory trick:
Mis – nome – r
mis(reminds of) = miss or not right
nome (reminds of) =
name
r (reminds of) = are
not right name areListen: Misnomer

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Are you perspicacious?

Perspicacious
Pronounced:
<per-spa-kay-shish>
Acutely insightful and wise.

My use:
I am much too perspicacious to fall for such a story. Instead, tell me the truth.

Literary use:
By Augustine
You are of all men the most perspicacious, and certainly the most learned.

Memory trick:
Perspi . cacious
Perspi(reminds of) = perspective
cacious (reminds of) = tenacious or hard working
perspective that is tenacious

Listen: Perspicacious

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Diffident

Diffident
Pronounced:
<dif-fa-dent>
Lacking confidence in one’s own ability.  Shy.

My use:
I was a diffident child.  I am now quite confident and friendly.

Literary use:
By Melmoth
You were always extremely diffident of their success.

Memory trick:
Diffi . dent
Diffi(reminds of) = different
dent (reminds of) = to ding or damage
different experiences dent my confidence

Listen: Diffident

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Tyro

Tyro
Pronounced:
<tie-row>

A beginner.  Someone new to a field.

My use:

I was a tyro computer programmer.  Now, I am an experienced programmer.

Literary use:
By Cowper
The management of tyros of eighteen is difficult.

Memory trick:
Ty – ro
Ty (reminds of) Tyke or child
ro (reminds of) row or level
child level

Listen: Tyro

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The rain is immoderate.

Immoderate
Pronounced:
<im-mod-er-rate> Means:
Excessive – Extravagant – Unreasonable

Use:
The rain was immoderate. Today the sun is shinning.
Literary use:
By Mary Howden
His humor was a delight, but the Neophyte from the beginning rigidly suppressed her tendency to immoderate mirth.

Memory trick:
im – moderate
im (means) not
moderate (means) average
not average

Listen: Immoderate


More...

Bibliophile

Pronounced:
< Bib-lee-oh-file >A person who loves books. Book collector.

....
.
.
.


Would you invite a priggish person to your party?


Would they be a lot of fun or a drag?
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
No. They would irritate you with their pointless rules and talk about annoying about petty things.


.
.
.
Apropos

Pronounced:
< ap-rah-poh >

Means: To do something at the right time. Appropriate.


.
.
.
.


Affable

Pronounced:
< aph-ah-bull >

It means:
Easy to approach.
Friendly.


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